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Vaccines — To What Extent Do They Really Work?: Measles Outbreak Traced to 'Fully Vaccinated' Patient for First Time

(click to see larger image)
Mass vaccinations are given credit for a steep decrease in outbreaks
of deadly diseases.  But these charts show that these disease out-
breaks had already run their course by the time "medical measures"
like vaccines (see arrows) were introduced. (Charts from the
published scientific study: "The Questionable Contribution of
Medical Measures to the Decline of Mortality in the United States
in the Twentieth Century"
)

By Nsikan Akpan
Get the measles vaccine, and you won’t get the measles—or give it to anyone else. Right? Well, not always. A person fully vaccinated against measles has contracted the disease and passed it on to others. The startling case study contradicts received wisdom about the vaccine and suggests that a recent swell of measles outbreaks in developed nations could mean more illnesses even among the vaccinated.

When it comes to the measles vaccine, two shots are better than one. Most people in the United States are initially vaccinated against the virus shortly after their first birthday and return for a booster shot as a toddler. Less than 1% of people who get both shots will contract the potentially lethal skin and respiratory infection. And even if a fully vaccinated person does become infected—a rare situation known as “vaccine failure”—they weren’t thought to be contagious.

That’s why a fully vaccinated 22-year-old theater employee in New York City who developed the measles in 2011 was released without hospitalization or quarantine. But like Typhoid Mary, this patient turned out to be unwittingly contagious. Ultimately, she transmitted the measles to four other people, according to a recent report in Clinical Infectious Diseases that tracked symptoms in the 88 people with whom “Measles Mary” interacted while she was sick. Surprisingly, two of the secondary patients had been fully vaccinated. And although the other two had no record of receiving the vaccine, they both showed signs of previous measles exposure that should have conferred immunity.

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