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New Net Neutraility Rules Approved By the FCC: Here's What You Need To Know

The FCC's Net Neutrality Vote

Rally for net neutrality, Los Angeles, CA - July 23, 2014. (Photo by Free Press)
Rally for net neutrality, Los Angeles, CA - July 23, 2014. (Photo by Free Press)
By Eyder Peralta

What does net neutrality mean?

Here's the Cliffs Notes version from NPR's Elise Hu:
"Net neutrality is the concept that your Internet provider should be a neutral gateway to everything on the Internet, not a gatekeeper deciding to load some sites slower than others or impose fees for faster service."
In other words, it's a concept in which Internet service providers (ISPs) don't discriminate when it comes to Internet traffic.
RELATED STORY: F.C.C. Approves Net Neutrality Rules, Classifying Broadband Internet Service as a Utility
[...]

What is the FCC voting on?
The Federal Communications Commission is voting on whether to reclassify broadband access as a "telecommunications service under Title II."
In layman's terms, the FCC is looking to reclassify broadband as a utility, which would give the commission more regulatory power over Internet providers.
RELATED STORY: Why Net Neutrality Isn't Worth Celebrating

[...]

The proposed rules are pretty lengthy, but from an FCC fact sheet, here are the three things that the rules would ban that matter most to consumers:
"No Blocking: broadband providers may not block access to legal content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices.

"No Throttling: broadband providers may not impair or degrade lawful Internet traffic on the basis of content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices.

"No Paid Prioritization: broadband providers may not favor some lawful Internet traffic over other lawful traffic in exchange for consideration — in other words, no 'fast lanes.' This rule also bans ISPs from prioritizing content and services of their affiliates."
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