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Natalie Cole, R&B and Jazz Singer, Daughter of Nat King Cole — Transitions at age 65 (Video)



By Larry Mcshane
Chart-topping R&B singer Natalie Cole, who followed her famous father in the music business with hits like “This Will Be (An Everlasting Love) and “Unforgettable,” died at age 65.

"Unforgettable"
Natalie Cole Performs a Duet with her Father Nat King Cole
Thanks to some digital magic



Natalie Cole, sister beloved & of substance and sound. May her soul rest in peace,” tweeted the Rev. Jesse Jackson on New Year’s Day.

Cole, who had struggled with a variety of health issues in recent years, died at a Los Angles hospital.

The daughter of music legend Nat King Cole scored a huge 1991 hit with “Unforgettable” — a virtual duet with her late father. He died before his daughter launched her solo career.

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Singer Natalie Cole dead at 65

By Todd Leopold

[...]

Born in 1950, Cole grew up among musical royalty. Her father was one of the most accomplished singers and jazz musicians of the postwar era, and her mother, Maria Hawkins Cole, was a singer for Duke Ellington. Their house, in Los Angeles' upscale Hancock Park neighborhood, was a regular spot for her parents' colleagues.



"I remember meeting Peggy Lee, Danny Thomas, Lena Horne, Dorothy Dandridge, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong and so many others at parties," she told The Wall Street Journal in 2014.

At age 6, Cole sang with her father on a Christmas album, and she was performing by the time she was 11. Nat King Cole died in 1965, when she was 15, a loss that "crushed" her, she said.

"Dad had been everything to me," she told the WSJ.

After college in Massachusetts, Cole embarked on her own career. In 1975, she had a massive hit with "This Will Be" from her album "Inseparable," which showed off her tremendous pipes -- she earned comparisons to Aretha Franklin -- and command of a range of styles. The work won her a Grammy for best new artist.

She followed that with other hits, including "I've Got Love on My Mind," "Our Love" and "Someone That I Used to Love."

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