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Cynthia Robinson, Sly and the Family Stone Trumpeter, Transitions at Age 71 — Check Out Her Wonderful Music (Video)

Cynthia Robinson


By Todd Leopold
Cynthia Robinson, whose brassy, forthright trumpet lit up Sly and the Family Stone songs such as "Dance to the Music," "Life" and "Hot Fun in the Summertime," died Monday, the band's publicist confirmed. She was 71.

Cynthia Robinson's Bright, Beautiful Sound On Full Display
"Running Away"

The cause of death was cancer, according to a post on her Facebook page.

"Friends, Family and Fans throughout the world, Cynthia Robinson, Trumpeter and Co-Founder of Sly and The Family Stone has passed," the post read. "Our condolences go out to the Robinson Family and her bandmates and all family & friends."

Robinson cut a distinctive figure in rock 'n' roll, even among the distinctive, multiethnic clan that made up Sly and the Family Stone. She was a female trumpeter, a position that set her apart, especially in the late '60s and early '70s when Sly and the Family Stone was one of the dominant groups in pop music.

"Don't Call Me Nigger, Whitey"


And her voice was unmistakable. That's her you hear saying, "Get up and dance to the music" in the opening of "Dance to the Music."

"Cynthia's role in music history isn't celebrated enough. Her & sister Rose weren't just pretty accessories there to 'coo' & 'shoo wop shoo bob' while the boys got the glory," wrote Questlove in an Instagram tribute. "Naw. They took names and kicked ass while you were dancing in the aisle."

The group -- which consisted of Sylvester "Sly Stone" Stewart, his brother Freddie and sister Rose, Robinson, Larry Graham, Greg Errico and Jerry Martini -- pulled from R&B, jazz, psychedelia, old-time music hall ("Hot Fun" had "piano triplets so corny they could have been composed by Booth Tarkington," rock critic Dave Marsh wrote in "The Heart of Rock and Soul") and straight-up rock 'n' roll.

For a time, they were the biggest band in the country, with an appearance at Woodstock and a trio of No. 1 records, their diversity considered symbolic of the era's youth.

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